Sunday, April 26, 2015

Creative Classroom Leadership



At first it felt risky. I didn't want to use stickers or names on the board or any of that. I knew that leading a class required being relational. I knew that it started with quality instruction. I knew that it required thinking creatively about the space and the rules and everything else. And yet . . . I screwed up. I yelled at my classes. I shamed a few kids without even realizing it. But I grew as a teacher. Over time, though, I've learned what it means to lead a class well and I enjoy sharing those strategies with other teachers.

Popular Posts about Classroom Leadership

Does It Impact Student Learning?
The Difference Between Praise and Affirmation
Don't Discipline the Group
Four Ways to Save Space When Setting Up a Classroom
Questions to Consider When Setting Up a Classroom
It Is Personal
Confusing Safety with Comfort
Rethinking Why Students Misbehave
From Procedures to Rituals
From Compliant Kids to Ethical Thinkers
What Should a Classroom Look Like? 
Sit Where You Want
Ten Reasons to Laugh in Class

Resources

Click on any of the links below and get the resource mailed directly to your inbox. 
Procedures Grid - Coming Soon
Preventative Classroom Management Guide - Coming Soon
Setting up Classroom Expectations - Coming Soon
Checklist of Procedures to Teach - Coming Soon
22 Time-Saving Ideas - Coming Soon
Discipline: Before, During, After - Coming Soon


Presentations

The following are workshops or sessions that I have given on the topic of assessment. Contact me at john@educationrethink.com if you are interested in having me lead a training.
  • Creative Classroom Space (Workshop): How do we take the limited space we have and turn it into a place where creativity and project-based learning thrive? Here we focus on developing plans to maximize the space and resources we have in a way that will allow creativity to thrive. 
  • The Indie Teacher (Keynote):  Students aren't looking for rockstar teachers to entertain them. They thrive on relationships of trust based upon the humility of teachers. The best classrooms look less like rock concerts (with the teacher putting on a great show) and more like jam sessions where students are experimenting, making mistakes and ultimately triumphing together.
  • Classroom Leadership (Workshop): As humble leaders, teachers have the chance to create clear expectations, logical procedures and engaging curriculum while still dealing with discipline in a relational way. Here, we focus on the before, during and after elements of leading a class. 
  • Preventative Behavior Management (Workshop): Often behavior management is treats student behavior as merely external, denying the motives behind why students misbehave. What if we took student motives into account as we developed our expectations and procedures? In this session, we focus on practical strategies teachers can use to prevent behavioral issues before they happen. 

No comments:

Post a Comment